Connected Health July 6, 2015

Written by: Sarah Shapleigh
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If you had the opportunity to attend any of the recent major conferences, such as CES, Social Media Week, or SXSW, chances are you attended a session (or five) related to health. Health tracking devices, such as wearables, and technology are coming together to create a connected health phenomenon that is completely changing the way patients monitor their health and receive care.

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The Aging Population

One stat that keeps popping up at conferences and in articles: By 2050, seniors over 60 years of age will outnumber children below the age of 15 for the first time.

With the rise of the aging population, there is a growing need for personalized healthcare and the ability to both connect elderly patients with their doctors and share this information with their loved ones. CarePredict, for example, is a company that offers a wearable device and health monitoring tool for the elderly. It tracks a person’s sleep, movement, and location, and can send this information back to their family.

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Types of Connected Health Users

IBM explains how today’s health devices are most commonly categorized into two groups: the health-conscious and fitness-focused (the “Motivated Healthy”), and the chronically or terminally ill who require regular monitoring (the “Chronically Monitored”). However, in between these two groups lies another much larger group: the “Information Seekers.” This segment is “seeking some measure of control over a potentially serious health risk or a condition that is difficult to manage. They represent a willing – but currently underserved – market for health device makers.”

There is a huge opportunity to focus in on the largest population of people in the United States within the connected health sphere. These people like to take elements of their health into their own hands and leverage health tracking devices to help adopt healthy behaviors and avoid serious health risks and conditions.

What does this mean for brands/marketers?

  1. Aim to deliver full solutions to patient needs associated with a condition. The “Information Seekers” group is the profitable part of the market many are trying to target with their connected health solutions.
  2. Don’t forget about the “Chronically Monitored” segment of patients. With the rise of chronic medical conditions, there is a growing need for connected health solutions for people with chronic conditions who require constant drug therapy and monitoring.
  3. Understand where consumer behavior and technology meet in order to create valuable solutions for consumers. The best-connected health solutions are created in response to specific problems with the overall patient experience. The solution should be rooted in insights and tackle optimizing patient experiences and meeting their needs.
  4. Adapt and optimize offerings based on performance. Feedback loops are an essential part of connected health, so there need to be opportunities to adapt and change as you learn what works and what doesn’t.
  5. Ensure that the connected health solution provides value and measurable impact. Now that there is a wealth of data surrounding patients’ health, there is an opportunity to leverage that data to create programs that provide value for patients. This data can help us understand where patients are in their health journey in order to create relevant and contextual experiences as a preventative measure or post-diagnosis.