Monthly Archives: October 2015

Halloween 2015 Marketing Stats and Trends

Written by: Digitally Approved
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Co-written: Hannah Redmond, Director of Strategy, and Rita Mogilanski, Senior Content Strategist

Halloween isn’t just a fun time for trick-or-treaters, it’s also a fun time for marketers. More than 157 million Americans plan to celebrate Halloween this year, spending an estimated $6.9 billion dollars. Brands have the opportunity to capitalize on consumers’ excitement and become relevant with deliberate seasonal content. Here are some content marketing trends and stats to consider this Halloween:

Brands are innovating in the digital space this Halloween.
Target launched an app called “Treatster” where consumers can find the best places to trick-or-treat. Users can add in their own houses and “up-vote” houses in the neighborhood to alert other trick-or-treaters in the area which doorbells they should ring.

34% of consumers used online search to find inspiration for their costume. (Statista) Researching and planning ahead online before buying in-store continues to be an integral part of the shopping experience this fall, with almost half of households nationwide researching online before purchasing Halloween-related items in physical stores.

Consumers are more likely to indulge during the holiday, whether they are celebrating it or not. The top 5 candy sales days of the year are in October. This is in part due to the “permissibility” people feel around the holiday – even those who aren’t trick-or-treating or going to a Halloween party still feel more comfortable enjoying a treat more than at other times of the year. Studies show that people think that the same treats “taste better” during the Halloween season (Mintel Reports).

Halloween videos account for 57% of seasonal makeup tutorial video views. (Think With Google)
Beauty and lifestyle brands should consider Halloween a key moment in their video and social marketing strategy.

Halloween-related searches on mobile grew more than 1,000% from last Halloween. (Bing Ads)This is one of many stats that confirms the need for all content to be mobile-friendly.

5 Ways Your B2B Marketing Strategy can Improve with Social Media

Written by: Sarah Shapleigh
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While no one can argue that social media is extremely important in any B2C strategy, when it comes to B2B marketing people aren’t always so sure. In a world where SEO and email typically reign supreme, social media can seem like an add-on or a lower priority component of the larger strategy.

Consider these statistics:

  • As of 2015, 65% of adults now use social media compared to 7% in 2005.
  • Facebook has nearly 1.4 billion users and generates 4.5 billion likes daily.
  • Twitter has over 284 million active users posting 500 million tweets per day.
  • 92% of consumers trust recommendations from friends and family more than any other form of advertising – just 10% trust brands today (Lithium).
  • 81% of consumers are influenced by their friends’ social media posts (Lithium).

However, social media is no longer an innovative, new way to drive awareness and sales for your brand.

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We Are Social

Essential to your organization’s survival in the competitive B2B landscape, it needs to be an integral part of any B2B marketing strategy. Social media helps B2B businesses showcase their credibility, acquire and retain customers, and build a strong reputation. “While tried-and-true B2B marketing techniques such as search engine optimization and email still bring plenty of prospects to the door, social media entices them to enter a dialogue, pick up some information of value and step into the sales funnel” (eMarketer).

Furthermore, social media can be even more impactful for a B2B company than for a B2C company. This is because B2B companies, as Convince and Convert explains, usually have “a smaller potential customer base, a higher average price point, and customer decision funnel that is more influenced by word of mouth and reputation.”

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eMarketer

Here are 5 tips for developing a social media strategy for B2B companies:

1. Understand your audience and engage with your customers on social media. Leverage social listening to understand the pain points for your customer – what are their needs and desires and how can your product/service help solve those problems? The main benefit of leveraging social media for B2B marketing is to build relationships with current and potential customers.

2. Use social media for content promotion. Share various forms of content such as videos, photos, or longer form content to showcase your products/services in a broader context and to drive the authentic voice of the brand.

3. Drive traffic to website. Ensure that your website is prominently highlighted on all of your social channels and within your posts. Utilize link tracking to see which content drives people to click through to the website.

4. Invest in social video to produce more leads. According to a report by Software Advice, “video is the most-used content type and the content that generated the most leads for surveyed B2B marketers in 2014.”

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Software Advice

5. Increase brand awareness with paid social. Allocating a percentage of the total budget to promoting social posts helps ensure that your content is visible to the right audiences. Social networks such as LinkedIn offer advanced targeting options for promoting your brand’s content, which ensures that you reach the most important and targeted audiences.

Social media is extremely valuable for top-of-funnel engagement and for generating strong leads for B2B companies. As we move into 2016, a social media component is going to be critical for every B2B marketing strategy.

3 Tips to Making Influencer Marketing Work

Written by: Jordan Lee
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In the social landscape, there are rising stars who have massive sway over their audiences. Influencer outreach began a decade ago, and often brands were able to just send product in order to get a few hits from bloggers. The landscape has evolved quickly over the past few years. Nearly every social platform has their own influencers, and some YouTube stars have eclipsed traditional celebrities. Making influencer marketing work for your brand can be made simple if best practices are followed and you keep in mind a few things special to the space:

1. Influence and size aren’t always synonymous.

It is easy to see a follower count and immediately be drawn to it. However, if this isn’t your first experience in the digital world, you know that numbers can be deceiving. There are bots, spam accounts that can inflate following numbers. Earlier this year, Instagram cleaned house on inactive and spam accounts. Some influencers only had incremental drops in followers, but some dropped by the thousands.

Great partners, networks, and MCNs will share engagement information with you to make the most educated guess on your real ROI. Stats like average views per video, typical click-through rates, and demographic breakdowns are highly valuable information and can set realistic expectations for value.

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Influencer stats example via Kin Community

2. Seek common ground.

Collaborating with influencers in the social space requires a lot of trust. Brands need to let go of control to create the best content with these partners. They know their audience best, and they aren’t going to be willing to compromise the relationship by producing something gimmicky or unnatural.

With larger, more intricate campaigns or content, it can be really helpful to schedule time with the influencer for a creative brief. This way purpose and expectations can be laid out and discussed prior to work being done. Both the brand and the influencer will be more comfortable throughout the process of the work with clear guidelines set.

3. Build genuine relationships.

This may appear to be a no-brainer, but often brands and agencies approach influencers with no genuine tie to their product or service. Influencers are becoming more and more selective about who they choose to work with. If an influencer never talks about your industry, or even has talked about your brand in a negative light, it is best to leave it be and move on. Time spent going far back and researching an influencer can really pay off in the long run because the influencer will also be excited about the partnership.

The best scenario is your influencer is already a fan of your brand. For example, Jeanette Getrost was already a fan of Lifetime’s Project Runway when approached to collaborate. This was a win for everyone; the influencer received meaningful work and Lifetime reaped the benefits of the genuine care put into each post.

Not every partnership is fortunate enough to work that way, nor does every brand find someone who is actively talking about them or their product. Creativity and limits can definitely be stretched if the idea is unique enough. For example, a corporation may have a responsibility initiative that may speak to an influencer’s passions, where they might have otherwise not been interested in working together.

It should go without saying, but just be honest and understanding in these partnerships. Leaving things on a good note with an influencer can open doors later on and ensure a positive reputation in the online community.

How Pinterest Connects Brands to Audiences Better Than You Think

Written by: Olga Kraineva
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When thinking of social networks that are beneficial for tune-in, Twitter comes to mind first. Twitter and TV are intertwined to the extent that Nielsen came out with SocialGuide two years ago to track TV viewing with Twitter. A less likely pair for TV networks? Pinterest.

With no strong data to support that the platform helps drive tune-in, why should networks dedicate time and resources to Pinterest? With 48.7 million users, Pinterest is quickly becoming one of the most popular ways to engage consumers. A Pinterest board full of interesting and relevant content can be extremely influential in engaging a brand’s target audience when strategically executed.

Like many, Lifetime was unsure of increasing their time commitment in the Pinterest space. However, looking at the similarities between the Lifetime viewer and the Pinterest user, it became apparent that focusing on the platform could be a great benefit to the TV network in terms of forming stronger connections with their target audience.

Lifetime viewers are 78 percent women, compared to 80 percent on the Pinterest platform. Fans of both also share an interest in music, fashion, and travel. From a brand perspective, Lifetime is working to shake off old-school views of the network, with a lot of younger women probably thinking, “Lifetime isn’t me.” What better way to discover new Lifetime programming than through carefully curated boards in topics that interest their target viewer with branded posts interspersed throughout? Pinners can see Lifetime pins and choose to repin them onto their own pages, an action by itself that makes the statement, “This is me.”

Pinterest.com/lifetimetv

Pinterest.com/lifetimetv

Aside from a brand play like Lifetime’s, TV Land just published a case study with Pinterest showing that using Promoted Pins and real-time optimization helped their show “Younger” achieve record-breaking ratings and season two pick up.

Pinterest.com/youngertv

Pinterest.com/youngertv

Pinterest helps brands build stories and experiences that speak to their audience members, building up a portfolio that defines the brand. TV networks’ investment in the platform can help extend the stories of their programs and most-loved characters, helping people continue to connect with their favorites. More importantly, it can help consumers discover new programs from places they might least expect.