All posts by Clare Dussman

Nielsen’s Consumer 360: 3 Quotes and What They Mean for Today’s Marketers

Written by: Clare Dussman
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If there was an overall theme to all of my learnings at Consumer 360, it was digital maturity. It’s no longer about your next pilot or stats to prove the validity of the space; it’s about being smart and digitally savvy across all of your business units. If not, you may be vulnerable to someone who is.

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“Data is the new oil.” – Daniel Zhang, CEO of Alibaba

Although not a new phrase, it’s worth taking note that one of the most powerful men in the Chinese technology world is openly stating that data will join the ranks as one of the most prominent trade goods. As a commodity, data needs to be judged for more than just its size, but also for quality and scarcity, whether that means the immensity of data in developed markets or the scarcity of data in developing economies.

“Leaders are all about purpose, never about me.” – Retired General Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State

This quote is powerful, especially as you think of how companies lead. As consumers expect more and more corporate transparency, companies without a clear purpose will struggle to become passion brands. Some companies already do a great job of conveying their purpose, like Ritz Carlton’s “We are ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen.” Or maybe like Google you require a Ten Commandments-esque format that includes Google’s well-known phrase “You can make money without doing evil,” and company rally calls like “Great just isn’t good enough.” Powell claimed when a group is lead by a purpose and not by a single charismatic leader, everyone is empowered to make decisions and drive success.

“Millennials don’t need to feel the fruit.” – Conference Attendee

As we discussed the tension between mobile commerce and brick and mortar, we agreed that the differences in shopping behavior between the generations raised with digital and the generations raised without digital require a revision of conventional shopping experiences. Especially as we looked at rapid changes in grocery, we acknowledged that quick delivery and low tolerance for waiting has driven many millennials to digital alternatives of the grocery experience.

Glass, 2 Years Passed

Written by: Clare Dussman
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Two years ago, I flew to Mountain View to cash in my golden tweet for what was being called a game-changer in the tech revolution and an assault device against personal privacy: Google Glass. Being a bleeding edge tech enthusiast, I was all in.

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Twenty-four months later, the Explorer program is over and though not exactly by choice, so is my Glass usage. Glass was well-made and intuitive. If I could wear it every day I would love it; however, others would not, which is why I do not.

Google made an elegant product and a horrific vertical.

Horrific may seem like a strong word, but it is purposeful. The people who came up to me asking why I was wearing it and if I was recording them were truly scared, uneasy, and defensive. Despite the extensive coverage of Glass in the media, there was distrust about heads-up displays so much so that wearing Glass was similar to having a controversial T-shirt on: you needed to be constantly at the ready to explain, defend, and oftentimes debate.

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It did not need to be that way. As a Glass Explorer, I think things could have been different. If I were the one to try and make it different, here is what I would have done:

  1. Brought down the cost. Part of what made Glass feel unobtainable was that it was financially unobtainable. The hardware did not warrant the steep price tag – even if the R&D cost did. The price tag immediately set Glass Explorers apart from the general public in a negative and pretentious way. At the consumer level, you cannot charge more than a thousand dollars for something that is in its humble beginnings and a luxury tech accessory.
  2. Advertised the ordinary. My favorite usage for Glass was more easily capturing presentation images, recordings, and whiteboard drawings during meetings without interrupting my concentration or the rest of the people in the room. When people categorize Glass with world travelers and NASA more than they see it as a useful tool for working moms to take better notes at a parent-teacher meeting, the device seems less relatable.
  3. Shed literal light on privacy concerns. You can clearly tell when someone with Glass is taking video because the screen lights up, but because the general public was not educated on Glass’ features in a clear and concentrated way, fear spread like wildfire. If there had been a small light on the headset that lit when people were recording, everyone could have relaxed a little. Although it is not ideal, features like this could have put the non-Glass wearing public at ease.

Launching a new category is no easy task. But, the lesson to be learned from Glass is not a new one: perception is reality and worry can overrule product.

Looking forward, I think Google’s pivot toward the business sector is smart, but they need to move quickly. There are acquisitions going on that point toward a competitor not far behind.

This article is a compilation of both my own ideas and conversations I have had with countless others while wearing Glass. Thank you to everyone who had educated and constructive conversations with me, greatly helping me understand the technology, the vertical, and the pros and cons of wearing bleeding edge technology on yo face.