All posts by Jordan Lee

3 Tips to Making Influencer Marketing Work

Written by: Jordan Lee
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In the social landscape, there are rising stars who have massive sway over their audiences. Influencer outreach began a decade ago, and often brands were able to just send product in order to get a few hits from bloggers. The landscape has evolved quickly over the past few years. Nearly every social platform has their own influencers, and some YouTube stars have eclipsed traditional celebrities. Making influencer marketing work for your brand can be made simple if best practices are followed and you keep in mind a few things special to the space:

1. Influence and size aren’t always synonymous.

It is easy to see a follower count and immediately be drawn to it. However, if this isn’t your first experience in the digital world, you know that numbers can be deceiving. There are bots, spam accounts that can inflate following numbers. Earlier this year, Instagram cleaned house on inactive and spam accounts. Some influencers only had incremental drops in followers, but some dropped by the thousands.

Great partners, networks, and MCNs will share engagement information with you to make the most educated guess on your real ROI. Stats like average views per video, typical click-through rates, and demographic breakdowns are highly valuable information and can set realistic expectations for value.

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Influencer stats example via Kin Community

2. Seek common ground.

Collaborating with influencers in the social space requires a lot of trust. Brands need to let go of control to create the best content with these partners. They know their audience best, and they aren’t going to be willing to compromise the relationship by producing something gimmicky or unnatural.

With larger, more intricate campaigns or content, it can be really helpful to schedule time with the influencer for a creative brief. This way purpose and expectations can be laid out and discussed prior to work being done. Both the brand and the influencer will be more comfortable throughout the process of the work with clear guidelines set.

3. Build genuine relationships.

This may appear to be a no-brainer, but often brands and agencies approach influencers with no genuine tie to their product or service. Influencers are becoming more and more selective about who they choose to work with. If an influencer never talks about your industry, or even has talked about your brand in a negative light, it is best to leave it be and move on. Time spent going far back and researching an influencer can really pay off in the long run because the influencer will also be excited about the partnership.

The best scenario is your influencer is already a fan of your brand. For example, Jeanette Getrost was already a fan of Lifetime’s Project Runway when approached to collaborate. This was a win for everyone; the influencer received meaningful work and Lifetime reaped the benefits of the genuine care put into each post.

Not every partnership is fortunate enough to work that way, nor does every brand find someone who is actively talking about them or their product. Creativity and limits can definitely be stretched if the idea is unique enough. For example, a corporation may have a responsibility initiative that may speak to an influencer’s passions, where they might have otherwise not been interested in working together.

It should go without saying, but just be honest and understanding in these partnerships. Leaving things on a good note with an influencer can open doors later on and ensure a positive reputation in the online community.

The More You Know: Wantering

Written by: Jordan Lee
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Online shopping can be overwhelming. Combing through a sea of retail sites, blogs, and Pinterest in search of something on trend to wear can feel daunting.

Many retail search engines, like ShopStyle and Polyvore, offer the same experience. You can sort by color, size, and price. A new site, Wantering, is offering something more to consumers: item search based on social popularity.

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Image via wantering.com

Ranking is determined by mentions across the web including blogs and social networks. Clicking on a product allows you to see both where it is most popular and a “hotness” score based on current mentions and relevancy.

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Image via wantering.com

Social influence impacts the consumer journey as a consultative force. According to a study by Bazaar Voice, 84% of millennials say user-generated content plays a role in their purchase decisions, even when that UGC is from a stranger. In addition, 71% of millennials say they share their opinions and input because they help other consumers’ purchase decisions.

Wantering is leveraging the movement of consumer empowerment and providing a unique online shopping experience. Product reviews are going to be weighted more and more in the future. Brands and retailers will need to not only keep up with how their products are evaluated but also with what is trending in order to drive sales in the changing shopper landscape.

Influencer R&D: The New Landscape of Brand Partnerships

Written by: Jordan Lee
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As the landscape of bloggers and social influencers changes, so do the partnerships that drive their content. As bloggers, YouTube stars, and Instagrammers become more popular, the campaigns become more robust. Product seeding is almost an expectation and not innovation in this landscape.

Bloggers partnering with retailers is nothing new. However, over the past few years, brands have been looking for ways influencers can shape their consumers’ experiences offline and bring innovation to influencer marketing. Target was one of the first brands to collaborate with these influential social stars and create product consumers can actually buy. Baublebar is another brand consistently partnering with bloggers to create products. Some mainstay products, like the Courtney Bib Necklace named for Courtney Kerr, owe their moniker to bloggers – a place in fashion typically reserved for models and actresses.

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Image via Target

The recent announcement of blogger Emily Schuman of Cupcakes and Cashmere partnering with Nordstrom to create a product line should come as no surprise. Undoubtedly, it’s a smart move for retailers. They are leveraging online popularity in a way that directly impacts sales in addition to any brand affinity generated by social media.

According to a study by Imperial, expert content by influencers lifted purchase intent over brand content by 38 percent, and 83 percent over user reviews. Influencers are critical to the purchase journey for consumers, so the extension of this is naturally influencer-created products.

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Image via Nordstrom

This collaboration correlates to the new normal for bloggers and social influencers. Those with larger star power are looking for more meaningful partnerships – for them this is a career path.

This new normal isn’t just product creation, either. YouTube stars are getting their own shows and some, like Flula Borg who recently appeared in Pitch Perfect 2, are landing movie roles. Others like Zoe Sugg are writing popular books.

Influencers are already becoming more selective about brand partnerships. Just having enough budget for fees is no longer going to land you a deal. Brands with thoughtful, meaningful integrations are going to win in the future of this landscape.

From Screen to Screen: Redefining Celebrity

Written by: Jordan Lee
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On an average day, there are roughly four billion YouTube video views. Additionally, YouTube is a social platform of choice for teens, with an 82 percent usage rate in the 14-17 age bracket. With this consumption, there are new stars rising.

YouTube stars have really taken off over the past few years, amassing millions of devout subscribers. Young people line up and wait for hours at conferences to meet their favorite YouTube stars. A plethora of management agencies that specialize in YouTube influencers are creating celebrity on their own terms with book deals, TV appearances, and more.

The newest development in this evolution is Grace Helbig and her new show on the E! Network. We’ve seen YouTube superstars appear on shows before, but this is the first time one has had their own namesake for a show. Just two episodes into watching and my husband walked in asking if I was watching YouTube videos on our Apple TV. I essentially was.

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Image via eoline.com

While these stars are exploring new formats, don’t expect them to change their voice. In an interview with USA Today Helbig explains how she is going to keep with the format of her web videos and wants everything to be transparent in the hopes that her young audience will follow her to TV.

Anyone with prior experience partnering and/or working with social influencers won’t find this transparency and dedication to voice to be a surprise. Their voice got them where they are, and fans expect consistency. Many of them are leading successful careers on their primary platform and those who wish to partner with social influencers and YouTube superstars should be prepared to let them take the reigns and share their expertise.

It’s important to consider what this means for television. Cable is already in a shaky place because of streaming services like Netflix and Hulu. While the rise of online videos could be a threat, traditional channels have the opportunity to leverage them in a meaningful way in order to survive. E! has definitely taken a huge risk and everyone will be watching to see if it succeeds. The entertainment industry will need to rethink what celebrity partnerships look like, because these social influencers are steadily becoming the new personality powerhouses. Authenticity and transparency will become a mainstay as this shift happens.

The More You Know: Yik Yak

Written by: Jordan Lee
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If you don’t know about Yik Yak, chances are you are a functioning, stable adult. So, what is Yik Yak exactly? It’s a careful formula that combines Twitter, Reddit, and Whisper into one ticking time bomb.

Users are geofenced into a 1.5-mile radius. They then post whatever is on their minds. Annoying professors? Check. Barista who spelled your name wrong? Check. Deep thoughts about time being a flat circle? Check. Other users in the area can then comment or vote on the post. Users are given a numerical score based on their upvotes or downvotes called their Yakarma  it ultimately lets you know how successful you are in the app. Dying to know what’s happening on the other side of town? You can Peek at that area to view the yaks, but not comment or vote.

Peeking at yaks of my former alma mater lets me know more about what’s going on than the alumni newsletter. The anonymity allows users to speak their minds freely. This is especially entertaining at college sporting events, where the yaks flow generously.

However, there has been some debate around the anonymity causing more harm than good. Several schools have noticed issues with discrimination. However, according to Yik Yak these kinds of posts are in violation of their terms and are subject to removal at any time. Plus, Yik Yak has taken measures to quell bullying on the app.

It should go without saying that if something is starting to get banned at schools, its popularity will only grow. With the addition of the national spotlight the app has received and the kickoff of its Spring Campus Tour, there’s nothing left to do but yak about it.

YikYak

Source: Obviously anonymous Yik Yak user