Category Archives: By The Numbers

By The Numbers

Prediction: Perceived Personalization

Written by: Eric Fransen
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It was sometime between my first battle with an Uruk captain and overthrowing my first war chief that I realized something was special about Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor. While the gameplay itself was fantastic, it was something in particular about the game’s enemies that struck me. Each Uruk had a unique name, appearance, and set of weaknesses, strengths and fears. Each Uruk had its own personality that was only present in my game. If I fell in battle to one, he made sure to let me know the next time I saw him — in alarmingly specific detail.

This is all thanks to Monolith’s Nemesis System. What the Nemesis System has managed to accomplish is something extraordinary — and noticeably lacking in many other of its AAA game brethren: perceived personalization. It wasn’t a matter of going after these Uruks because the game said I had to — I went after them because I wanted to. For sweet, sweet vengeance. It was no longer purely a game mechanic. It was personal. It was as if I KNEW the Uruk and he existed purely to antagonize me and make my life more difficult. All of this made it that much more satisfying by the time I was able to exact my revenge by parting his head with his shoulders.

So what does this all have to do with digital marketing? Everything.

You see, Monolith has stumbled onto something utterly brilliant. Mechanics that go a long way in making you, the consumer, feel like you’re having a completely unique experience. At its core, the Nemesis system is essentially a bank of possible names, attributes, personalities and sound bytes that combine to form randomly created characters. But it’s how it all comes together to form a cohesive experience that’s where it really shines.

You could apply this same logic to attributes in product design, custom web experiences, or experiential events. If you feel like you’re the first and/or only person to experience something, how much better of an experience is that compared to a one-size-fits-all approach? By creating something truly unique, you’re creating social currency and empowering your consumers to speak on your behalf.

But why perceived personalization? Isn’t it just personalization? Yes and no. Yes, the experience is unique and personalized to me, the end user. But where I see the differentiation is the fact that it’s unique without any additional input from either the development side OR the user side. It’s a highly sophisticated automated system that makes me FEEL like it’s built specifically for me. That’s the magic. And something I believe we are going to start seeing even more in 2015.

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts. With the holiday season in full swing, this week’s post is focused on the expected habits of consumers during the busiest shopping season of the year.

The Average Shopper will do 44% of Holiday Shopping Online

An infographic from Shortstack reports that consumers who celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa will spend an average of $804.42 this year. The infographic also says mobile devices, social media and email will play large roles in customer’s holiday shopping habits this season.

Here’s a look at how consumers will use online and mobile:

  • The average shopper will do 44% of holiday shopping online
  • More than 80 percent (84 percent) of shoppers use their mobile devices before or during a shopping trip.
  • One in three shoppers uses his smartphone for information while shopping instead of asking an employee.
  • Mobile commerce will make up 33 percent of online holiday sales in the U.S. this year.
  • Twenty-five percent of shoppers say whether a retailer has an easy-to-use mobile website is an important factor in their decision to shop there.

Source: Ragan.com

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts.

Online Grocery Sales will Grow from $23 Billion in 2014 to Nearly $100 Billion by 2019

Online shopping has exploded over the past decade with consumers avoiding busy stores for the convenience of shopping 24/7 anywhere that has Wi-Fi. We typically associate online shopping with the holiday season, but in reality, consumers are using the net to buy everything from flowers and clothing to electronics, music and even caskets (you gotta love Costco).

Over the past few years food and beverage marketers have used the internet and social media to promote their brands to billions of consumers worldwide, which creates an enormous potential for online sales.

While online grocery shopping is currently one of the smallest segments for food and beverage sales, this rapidly changing business is poised for tremendous growth over the next several years. According to a new report from Packaged Facts, online grocery sales will grow from $23 billion in 2014 to nearly $100 billion by 2019, capturing 12 percent of total grocery spending, according to a new report from Packaged Facts.

“Meeting at the crossroads of technology and service, online grocery shopping offers the grocery industry’s most exciting potential because it is the fastest-growing channel in the grocery arena,” said Packaged Facts research director David Sprinkle. “It’s clear that U.S. consumers have become increasingly comfortable with shopping for groceries via Internet and reliant upon home delivery and easy pickup of pre-picked orders.”

The online grocery business has become crowded with participants—some well-established, and many of which entered this business only in the past two years. To date, fewer than a dozen online grocery services with the potential to be viable on a national level or across a wide swath of the country have emerged from the fray. Although they are still at early stages of test-marketing, companies such as Amazon.com and Walmart have a leg up in operating nationwide online grocery services because of their large infrastructures of warehouses dotting the country, advanced logistics and delivery systems, clout with suppliers, and wide assortment of products—resulting in the potential to cross-sell and deliver high-ticket and more profitable items in the same order, shipment or truck.

In contrast, supermarkets (even the nation’s largest chains) operate primarily under regional or local banners. And while few major players have emerged as yet, all across the United States, both in cities and suburbs, a multiplicity of local grocers and shopping/delivery services are springing up under the radar.

But the online grocery business has unique challenges as it strives to reach its potential. According to the “Online Food Shopping and Grocery Delivery in the U.S.: Future of Food Retailing” report, over the next five years, online grocery service providers will develop models that solve the logistics problems while being profitable for the operators. As this happens, online services will become more widely available throughout the country and consumers will become more confident in shopping for food and beverages online. It’s expected for these developments to take place in leaps and bounds as, for example, Amazon Prime Pantry rolls out across the country, AmazonFresh spreads to more cities, and more retailers get on board the United States Postal Service’s planned delivery system.

Interestingly, a 2013 report by Packaged Facts found a trend of major changes in grocery retailing. According to the report, the greatest competition to supermarkets and grocery stores is from supersized stores like supercenters and warehouse clubs, however other retail channels like drugstores, dollar stores, limited assortment chains and online grocery shopping also pose a great threat. Data also showed 83 percent of shoppers cited being satisfied with the store(s) where they usually shop for groceries, 56 percent enjoy grocery shopping and 18 percent actively dislike grocery shopping. This suggests that retailers have room to improve in making grocery shopping easier, less burdensome and enjoyable for a significant amount of their customers.

Source: FoodProductDesign.com

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts.

4 out of 5 Millennials Shop Directly from Mobile Devices

One of the challenges facing small business owners during the holiday shopping season is marketing to millennials.

This demographic has a unique set of shopping habits. For example, four out of five millennials shop directly from mobile devices, and nearly 70 percent won’t wait more than five seconds for a page to load, according to survey data from cloud-based software company Instart Logic.

Their infographic below explains how to take advantage of millennial shoppers this holiday season by optimizing mobile shopping experiences.

Source: Inc. Magazine

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts.

Teenagers are Snapchat’s Biggest Fans

Snapchat ran its first advertisement this past weekend. So, who’s been using the service? According to July 2014 polling by NuVoodoo, teenagers are the platform’s biggest fans.

Among 14-to-17-year-old US internet users surveyed, 36.8% said they used Snapchat at least weekly. Meanwhile, 18- to 34-year-olds trailed by nearly 16 percentage points, and a mere 4.2% of those ages 35 to 54 smiled, snapped and sent. In all, the total percentage of internet users who said they accessed Snapchat once a week or more came in at just 14.2%—so to say teens overindex in usage is a big understatement.

Q2 2014 research by GlobalWebIndex found similar results. While just 14% of US mobile internet users ages 16 to 64 said they had accessed Snapchat in the past month, a far higher 42% of the teens in that group (16- to 19-year-olds) reported doing so.

And of course, when teens are taken out of the picture, the percentage drops even more: A September 2014 study by Raymond James found just 11% of US adult internet users actively used Snapchat.

Source: eMarketer

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts.

62% of Consumers Expect Live Chat to be Available on Mobile Devices

Sixty-two percent of consumers expect live chat to be available on mobile devices, and 82% would use it, according to a new study commissioned by Moxie Software. Seventy-five percent of survey respondents stated that they would prefer to use live online chat versus calling to speak with an agent.

According to the study, consumers’ growing preference for online chat provides companies an opportunity to enhance the customer journey and increase customer satisfaction, specifically on mobile devices. Seventy-two percent of respondents reported they were satisfied or very satisfied with their customer support experience when shopping online, but the level of satisfaction increases to 92% when live chat is used on a mobile device.

“Today, people have their mobile phones with them at all times and they are primarily using them to research information, message family and friends and engage with apps,” said Nikhil Govindaraj, VP of products, Moxie.

Additional insights from the study reveal the following trends:

  • Holiday shoppers expect superior service and live chat: consumers who plan to make purchases on mobile devices this holiday season expect top-notch service and support. Sixty percent of consumers abandon their online shopping carts and never make purchases from an online retailer again if they experience poor customer service.
  • Men shop often on mobile devices: Twice as many men than women surveyed make daily purchases online and are making more weekly purchases as well;
  • Millennial men are active online shoppers: Millennial men are becoming the new power shoppers, and those living in the Pacific region (California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii and Alaska) are among the most active online shoppers in the nation.

Source: Chain Store Age

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts.

Facebook Hits 1 Billion Video Views per Day

Facebook on Monday said it has hit 1 billion video views per day as the social network ramps up efforts to rival YouTube as an online video powerhouse. To highlight popular content and promote sharing, Facebook will start showing the number of views a publicly posted video has gotten at the bottom of a post.

From May to July, Facebook said video views have surged 50%, with more than 65% of the total taking place on mobile. That underscores the broader shift the social network has seen from desktop to mobile use in the last couple of years, with mobile now also accounting for the bulk (62%) of ad revenue.

After introducing auto-play video earlier this year, Facebook noted in a blog post today that the feature has led people to discover “significantly more content” as a result. And when advertisers designate video views as the objective of their campaigns, that step translates into up to a 60% decrease in cost-per-view for video ads, the company said.

“So in the coming weeks, we’ll extend the availability of videos that play automatically to more content from more brands in the U.S.,” stated a blog post today by Fidji Simo, a product management director at Facebook. She also confirmed that the company is testing a new feature in mobile suggesting additional related videos when someone finishes watching one.

A separate post also highlighted the addition of deeper video analytics tools in May, as well as the ability for video publishers to add a call-to-action, such as visiting a Web site or making a purchase, at the end of a video, to drive interaction and/or transactions.

During Facebook’s second-quarter conference call, COO Sheryl Sandberg said the social network was running about a dozen premium video ad campaigns, with the early data showing promising results. To enhance its video ad offering, Facebook in July acquired startup LiveRail, a platform that helps publishers such as MLB.com and A&E Networks to better target their video ads.

In terms of Web video audience, Facebook ranks second only to YouTube, but is still well behind. Its 103 million unique video viewers in the U.S. in July compared to 157 million for YouTube. Still, Facebook’s video audience has grown about 27% between May and July versus only about 5% for YouTube. When it comes to views, the Google-owned video hub was delivering 4 billion a day at the start of 2012, and that figure has likely grown significantly since then.

Source: MediaPost