Tag Archives: second screen

SMWNYC 2015: “The Evolution of Social TV”

Written by: Rita Mogilanski
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SMWNYI attended Social Media Week in NYC last week and was impressed by the massive turnout. Each year, more and more people attend this conference as more agencies, platforms, products and brands try to keep up with the ever-changing space. One particularly noteworthy session (besides the fireside chat with social media celebrity Pete Cashmore) highlighted the evolution of social TV and featured panelists representing research and analytics agencies, as well as major television networks.

3 key takeaways from the session:

  1. “Social” and “TV” should not be considered two separate entities.

Television has always been naturally social. It has consistently been the main topic of conversation around the “watercooler,” even as the watercooler moved from the office to the Internet. Advertisers and content creators should not split “social” and “TV” from each other. Social TV as a concept revolves around making TV content appropriate for social platforms or including elements that encourage social conversation. Realistically, all content should be driving conversation and connecting fans with each other and with the cast members. Compelling TV content should be everywhere, influencing conversations in real time from the TV screen or from the second screen.

  1. Analytics and measurement tools need to adjust how they are assessing viewer data.

Qualitative measurements are becoming more important than quantitative measurements. The sheer number of people who are talking about your show in real time on social is not as important as the sentiment of the conversation and figuring out the emotional connection fans have. Did the majority of fans enjoy the episode? Will they return for the next episode?

The future of social TV measurement tools is moving toward a standard to assess all the different social platforms. Twitter is currently the main platform where real time marketing is being measured, but moving forward there will need to be a metric that takes all platforms and quality of social conversation into consideration to provide one standard of measurement. Additionally, with the new TV viewing habits of binge watching on weekends and watching TV online, networks may have to change how they look at each viewer. Traditionally, networks valued live viewership, but the viewer who watches five episodes in a row on a Sunday may be more valuable than one user who watched the show live.

SMWNY2

  1. Leveraging talent is the best way to reach fans.

Celebrities are naturally influential and can reach millions of users with just one click of the “retweet” button. Booking talent specifically for episodes paves the way for organic participation, as talent will want to encourage users to watch them on the show. Giving talent on a show a guide to how they can promote themselves on social, as well as plenty of content to promote on their channels, will help drive natural conversation.

Social TV is moving so fast that networks are scrambling to keep up. The traditional way of measuring viewership is slowly evolving. Those of us looking at social data to inform content need to keep sentiment in mind over volume, and look for ways to seamlessly integrate social to drive natural conversation.

List of panelists: http://socialmediaweek.org/newyork/events/evolution-social-tv/

Stats of the Week

Written by: Jackie Mendez
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Every week we compile lots of interesting stats here at Fanscape and we try to share a lot of what we learn with you in these posts.

84% of Smartphone and Tablet Users in the U.S Watch TV with a Second Screen

Social media and its connection with TV networks and brands keeps growing: Now 84% of smartphone and tablet users in the U.S. watch TV with a second screen.
Nielsen Social says when it comes to brands and people and using social media in conjunction with TV networks, some general trends have become clear when it comes to key advertising categories.

For “wireless network” advertising/brands the top “affinity” scores go to many sports networks: NFL Network (2.7), Adult Swim (2.7), CNN (2.5), WGN America (2.5), and NBA TV (2.4) get high marks. The average for all TV networks in this category is a 2.0 score.

Looking at other brand types: For “personal care” advertisers, young viewing networks did well: Adult Swim (2.8), Nickelodeon (2.7), E! (2.6), Teen Nick (2.6), and Oxygen (2.5) had the best results. The average here among all TV networks was a 2.0.

Household product brands earned the best marks with those networks heavy into reality TV shows. Here A&E (2.7), VH1 (2.5), FX (2.5), E! (2.4), and BET (2.4) did well. The average among all networks in this category was a 1.9 number.

Source: MediaPost

Advertisers Should Hop On The Second Screen Bandwagon

Written by: Rita Mogilanski
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For many, advertisements before videos are 30 seconds of branded agony. When all you want is the sweet satisfaction of the newest Jenna Marbles video, those ads had better be great. Wheat Thins got it right with the latest iteration of their Spicy Buffalo spot. This funny video ad features icons on the bottom right corner of the screen that each link to their respective social platforms.

Wheat ThinsI came across this ad on a TV network’s website while watching an episode clip. The ad is clickable, but links to Wheat Thins’ Twitter account while most banner ads or video ads link to a brand’s main website. Wheat Thins demonstrated that they know their target audience – millennials – and where they will be consuming content and how they want to interact with a brand. Ads that only link to websites are a waste from both a business perspective and user experience. If I accidentally click on it, I quickly leave the site, driving up the bounce rate. As a user, I am much more likely to seek out the brand’s Twitter account if I have questions, their Facebook page if I want to interact with them, or their YouTube channel or Vine account if I love their video content or brand voice.  

The lines between TV, social media, and advertising have become extremely blurry. A whopping 72% of people use mobile devices for video viewing and 75% of people use mobile devices while watching TV. Studies also show that some people aren’t watching TV in the traditional way at all, with 34% of millennials watching mostly online video and no broadcast TV.

Television shows have embraced this shift in attention, while many television advertisers have not.

The integration of social into TV and media has a direct impact on marketing and advertising. With more viewers using social and digital for an enhanced TV experience, custom online and second screen content needs to be a priority for advertisers. Television ads or video ads should have a social component or social call-to-action that can get fans involved. This is especially true for live television programming like sporting events and award shows. During live TV events, fans feel even more inclined to engage in real time with other fans and to avoid spoilers later. Wheat Thins’ social channel links on their video advertisement allow the viewer to easily continue the conversation online after the ad is over.

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” is a great example of a show that has strategically increased its emphasis to a digital audience. While NBC expects Fallon’s ratings to be below that of predecessor Jay Leno, Fallon’s content is much more digital and social, and therefore more appealing to the desirable and hard-to-reach millennial audience. Clips from Fallon’s episodes become viral regularly, in turn not only promoting the show but also attracting advertisers.

Jimmy Fallon Tweet

While traditional television ads are not going anywhere anytime soon, it is imperative that advertisers keep up with the shift toward second screen viewing and social media interaction. Be on the lookout for a pop-up on your iPad that drives you directly to the product being advertised on your TV, or mobile apps that can scan ads in magazines and locate the closest store with the item in stock.

In the meantime, if you need me, I’ll be live-tweeting commercials.

Headlines & Stuff

Written by: Digitally Approved
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Here are some cool things we read about this past week:

Twitter Opens Advertising API
Twitter announced this week that it is opening up its advertising API, enabling a handful of launch partners to build their own tools for creating and managing ad campaigns on the platform. The five launch partners include: Adobe, Salesforce.com (BuddyMedia), HootSuite, Shift and TBG Digital (which is one of Facebook’s biggest ad partners).

Twitter Now Reducing Some Tweets to 117 Characters
If you’re tweeting a URL, your tweets just got a bit shorter. Starting this week, any tweet sent with a URL will be reduced to 118 characters, or 117 for https links.

Pinterest Valued at $2.5B
Social scrapbooking site Pinterest has secured $200M at the valuation of $2.5B. Pinterest is now worth more than public traded internet companies Zynga, Yelp and Pandora, even though they have yet to generate any revenue.

Facebook to Partner with Acxiom, Epsilon to Match Store Purchases With User Profiles

Facebook is testing out a new kind of ad targeting that will let brands market to users based on what they’ve bought in stores. Facebook is partnering with data giants like Epsilon, Acxiom and Datalogix to allow brands to match data gathered through shopper loyalty programs to individual Facebook profiles, much like it’s done previously with marketers’ customer data from their CRM databases. The targeting would hypothetically enable Coca-Cola to target teenagers who have bought the soda within the last month.

Global Social Media

Facebook to Open up 100 Jobs in Dublin to Expand European Hub
Facebook is bring 100 new positions to Ireland as part of its ongoing expansion in Europe. Irish broadcaster RTE says this will add to Facebook’s team of 400, already in the country.

Google Goes Pop With Asian Hangouts
Google has joined forces with Chinese, Korean and Japanese pop stars to promote the Google+ Hangout service via its A-Pop Star Week starting March 8. The artists will answer audience questions via YouTube promotional videos or fans can post queries using Google+ hashtags. Each C-Pop, K-Pop and J-Pop artist will select five people with the most creative questions to participate in personal Hangouts. Google is also rolling out an A-Pop channel which will act as a hub for live streaming concerts from Asian artists.

Noteworthy Campaigns

NBC’s The Biggest Loser Partners With Pinterest for Seconds Screen Content
The Biggest Loser has teamed up with social network Pinterest to provide a second screen experience. This week, the TV show began directing viewers to the Pinterest account for instructional content based on the current episode of the reality show. Show creators also began showing pop-ups on screen to remind Pinterest users to check out healthy recipes that were fed to contestants. Along with show tips, the Pinterest account also includes a “Tips from the Trainer’s” section, which offers matching video on the show’s web page.

Ford Gives Free Cars to Social Media Influencers
Ford kicked off Social Media Week in New York this week with the announcement that it is launching an updated version of its “Fiesta Movement” campaign, supplying bloggers, tweeters and other social media users with a brand new Fiesta for six months, asking them to document the experience. Ford’s head of social media, Scott Monty, said 100 people, including some celebrities, would receive the cars in what he said was a “social remix” of the company’s 2009 campaign.